The University of Cape Town’s Intellectual Property (IP) Unit strives to add an African voice to the global debate on IP-related issues. Our focus is on examining the link between IP, innovation, development and public policy. We aim at creating a leading IP programme in Africa that translates cutting edge research into excellent teaching and increases the number of highly-skilled African IP experts. Important issues range from the way in which we access and share knowledge to strategies how to commercialise inventions and avoid misappropriation. IP is a key determinant of human development, economic growth and competitiveness; and IP rules impact on various public policy areas including health, research and development, bio-diversity, clean technologies, food security, and education.

New article in Nature Biotechnology: A solution to the controversy on plant variety protection in Africa

A new article by Dr. Bram de Jonge, Dr. Niels P. Louwaars and Professor Julian Kinderlerer addresses the issue that African countries are fast-tracking the protection of plant varieties by embracing the 1991 Convention of the International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV). The West-African Organisation Africaine de la Propriété Intellectuelle joined UPOV as its fifth African member in 2014. Around the same time, UPOV assessed a draft legislation of the African Regional Intellectual Property Organization to be in conformity with its 1991 Act, paving the way for this East-African organization to become a UPOV member as well. The Southern African Development Community is currently drafting similar legislation. Together, these regional organizations represent 42 African countries. These decisions at the diplomatic level create controversy regarding possible negative impacts on smallholder farmers’ seed systems. We show in this commentary that African countries, by seizing the opportunity to implement a broad interpretation of one of the UPOV 1991 provisions, can overcome the controversy and establish a PVP system that supports commercial seed systems without negatively affecting smallholders.

Nature Biotechnology 33(5), pp. 487–488, May 2015, http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v33/n5/full/nbt.3213.html

Open AIR is looking for a Canada-based co-manager

opeairlogoThe Open African Innovation Research network, “Open AIR”, seeks an inspiring associate to co-manage the next phase of its collaborative research, training and outreach activities.

The Project Manager’s job is to help the network achieve our shared goals of:

  • Executing large-scale, empirical research on knowledge governance and innovation;
  • Building relationships among collaborators in Canada, the countries of Africa and the world;
  • Mentoring students who will become the next generation of emerging global leaders; and
  • Reaching out beyond the academic community to ensure our research has real-world impact.

Achieving our goals requires a Canada-based Project Manager to coordinate an array of complex tasks, working closely with our current management staff and research personnel throughout Africa. Our new Canada-based Project Manager will work especially closely with our network’s co-manager based at the University of Cape Town. More information, including salary, application deadline and contact details, is available here.

Marrakesh Treaty – Implementation Guide South Africa

marrakeshpicIn recognition of World IP Day 2015, the UCT IP Unit has published its Briefing Paper Marrakesh Treaty – Implementation Guide South Africa. The guideline document aims to enable the South African lawmaker to swiftly move forward with the implementation of the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired or Otherwise Print Disabled, in line with the country’s public expression of support for the treaty. The document examines the compatibility of the provisions of the treaty with the current copyright regime in South Africa and, where necessary, it provides suggestions for legislative amendments. The copyright law revision process currently underway in South Africa, together with the country’s goal of introducing a national IP Policy, provide a unique opportunity for making these changes in a timely manner.

Draft Protection, Promotion, Development and Management of Indigenous Knowledge Systems Bill published for comment

Screen Shot 2015-04-28 at 11.46.51 AMAt the end of March 2015 the Draft Protection, Promotion, Development and Management of Indigenous Knowledge Systems Bill was published in Government Gazette 38574. Written comments on the draft bill by members of the public and interested parties may be submitted to the Department of Science and Technology until 19 May 2015.

The IP Unit intends to submit its comments before the deadline on 19 May 2015.

The Bill aims to provide for:

  • the protection, promotion, development and management of indigenous knowledge systems
  • the establishment and functions of the National Indigenous Knowledge Systems Office
  • the management of rights of indigenous knowledge holders
  • the establishment and functions of the Advisory Panel on indigenous knowledge systems
  • access and conditions of access to knowledge of indigenous communities
  • the registration, accreditation and certification of indigenous knowledge holders and practitioners
  • the facilitation and coordination of indigenous knowledge systems-based innovation.

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SAIPLJ: call for papers

The South African Intellectual Property Law Journal (SAIPLJ) hereby calls for submissions for publication in the 2015 issue.
Contributions on all aspects of intellectual property law that have relevance to Africa, particularly South Africa, are welcome. Submissions may be in the form of articles or notes not exceeding 10 000 words and 6000 words respectively. All submissions must be of a scholarly nature and conform to the SAIPLJ house style (available at www.jutalaw.co.za).
The journal is published by Juta & Co and is double peer-reviewed.
The SAIPLJ accepts submissions on an ongoing basis, however, the final submission date for consideration for the 2015 issue is 30 April 2015.
Submissions and enquiries can be directed to the Editors at editoriplj@uct.ac.za

 

UCT IP Unit contributes to Network of African Science Academies (NASAC) forum on Open Access

NASAC logoThe Network of African Science Academies (NASAC) in collaboration with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) recently held a ‘Consultative Forum on Open Access: Towards high level interventions for research and development in Africa’ in Nairobi, Kenya, on 29-30 January 2015.

Michelle Willmers, former Programme Manager of the Scholarly Communication in Africa Programme and current Project Manager of the Open Data Africa Initiative in the UCT IP Unit, was one of the scholarly communication experts invited to present in the forum. The two-day meeting drew together senior representatives from African science academies and was intended as a springboard to consolidate and promote a regional approach in advancing the Open Access agenda in Africa. The discussion covered a wide range of scholarly communication issues, ranging from new approaches to journal publishing and peer review to curation and intellectual property.

Questions around intellectual property, rights management and patenting are of central importance in the local debate around Open Access as many African institutions straddle the space between new open approaches and traditional more closed systems of practice. The need to consolidate efforts at regional level and lobby government for support and engagement with Open Access issues was one of the principle recommendations emerging from the forum.

The full set of final Scholarly Communication in Africa Programme (SCAP) outputs (including useful briefing papers on various aspects of Open Access) can be accessed here.

Copyright policy and the right to science and culture

By Caroline Ncube, Reposted from Afro-IP

download (1)A report entitled ‘Copyright policy and the right to science and culture’ authored by  the Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights, Farida Shaheed has been released (download it here, ref A/HRC/28/57 ).

 

The document summary reads:

‘In the present report, the Special Rapporteur examines copyright law and policy from the perspective of the right to science and culture, emphasizing both the need for protection of authorship and expanding opportunities for participation in cultural life.Recalling that protection of authorship differs from copyright protection, the Special Rapporteur proposes several tools to advance the human rights interests of authors. The Special Rapporteur also proposes to expand copyright exceptions and limitations to empower new creativity, enhance rewards to authors, increase educational opportunities, preserve space for non-commercial culture and promote inclusion and access to cultural works. An equally important recommendation is to promote cultural and scientific participation by encouraging the use of open licences, such as those offered by Creative Commons.’

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UCT IP Unit involved in a new OCSDNet project

Screen Shot 2015-01-20 at 10.15.17 AM The IP Unit is involved in a new project carried out under the Open and Collaborative Science in Development Network (OCSDNet). The ‘Empowering Indigenous Peoples and Knowledge Systems Related to Climate Change and Intellectual Property Rights’ project examines processes of open and collaborative science related to indigenous peoples’ knowledge, climate change, and intellectual property. Participatory action research (“PAR”) will be carried out together with indigenous KhoiSan peoples to assess the following: (1) how climate change has impacted their communities; (2) how they have produced indigenous knowledge related to addressing climate change and alternative strategies; (3) how such knowledge is characterized (or not) as indigenous intellectual property and openly shared (or not) with the outside public; (4) and what types of laws and policies (including intellectual property rights) promote and/or hinder these strategies and open collaboration with the public? The 2-year project is led by Natural Justice researcher Catherine Traynor, who explains the project in this YouTube clip.

AJIC Journal Call for Articles: “African Intersections between IP Rights and Knowledge Access”

LINK logo-3The African Journal of Information and Communication (AJIC), an accredited, peer-reviewed journal published by the LINK Centre at Wits University in Johannesburg, is calling for submissions to its 2015 Thematic Issue to be entitled “African Intersections between IP Rights and Knowledge Access”. Submissions, to Guest Editor Chris Armstrong, are due on or before 30 April 2015. Go to the Call for Submissions.

South African Intellectual Property Law Journal (2014)

(By Caroline Ncube, Reposted from Afro-IP)

23094532_IPLJ_1.png.400x400_q85_subsampling-2 betterThe second volume of the SA Intellectual Property Law Journal, published by Juta Law and edited by Lee-Ann Tong & Caroline Ncube is now available.

Juta Law is a RoMEO white publisher and the full length articles are not immediately available online to non-subscribers. Some articles will be available after June 2015 via institutional repositories affiliated with the authors, where they are available.

For more information:
See here for Juta Law’s copyright & self-archiving policies
See here for purchase and subscription
Relevant Institutional Repositories: UCT, Stellenbosch University, University of Pretoria, University of the Western Cape

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